Music of the Spheres

An Exercise in Listening

33 notes

markrichardson:

Some lost evening a few weeks ago I watched a large chunk of this 2007 interview with Steve Jobs and Bill Gates. A lot of interesting history here. One or both of these guys was in the room when many major decisions that would have a huge impact on culture were made. Interesting how different they are in terms of presence. Jobs really is magnetic and always seems hyper confident, and there’s an interesting undercurrent here where both the interviewers and the audience know and understand that Apple is considered much more “cool” and innovative. That’s a given, and Jobs relishes that. There are quite a few subtle moments where people poke fun at stodgy old Microsoft. But Gates actually seems pretty comfortable with that here, he seems like someone who knows who he is. Perhaps he’s so comfortable because he knows that while Jobs was working like crazy to figure out how to make the world pay $600 for a telephone, uncool non-visionary Bill Gates was heading up a foundation that saved the lives of millions of children who would have otherwise died of malaria. 

2 658 notes

raboartcollection:

"Stagnation and movement as opposing forces form a fundamental motif that recurs in many of my works." Lonnie van Brummelen
Lonnie van Brummelen, movistar (1999) 
film (16 mm), kleur
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.Rabo Art Collection

raboartcollection:

"Stagnation and movement as opposing forces form a fundamental motif that recurs in many of my works." Lonnie van Brummelen

Lonnie van Brummelen, movistar (1999) 

film (16 mm), kleur

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

232 notes

explore-blog:

Legendary graphic designer Paula Scher's brilliant visual complaint about useless information. Pair with David Byrne on how to be an educated consumer of infographics, then play devil’s advocate with this fantastic 1936 essay on the usefulness of useless knowledge.
The poster is part of the exhibition Complaints! An Inalienable Right at Miami’s Wolfsonian Museum, curated by Steven Heller, featuring contributions by Milton Glaser, Debbie Millman, Noma Bar, Emily Oberman, yours truly, more

explore-blog:

Legendary graphic designer Paula Scher's brilliant visual complaint about useless information. Pair with David Byrne on how to be an educated consumer of infographics, then play devil’s advocate with this fantastic 1936 essay on the usefulness of useless knowledge.

The poster is part of the exhibition Complaints! An Inalienable Right at Miami’s Wolfsonian Museum, curated by Steven Heller, featuring contributions by Milton Glaser, Debbie Millman, Noma Bar, Emily Oberman, yours truly, more