Music of the Spheres

An Exercise in Listening

11 758 notes

This whole notion of doing only work that you love has always affronted me but I’ve lacked the articulation to be able to explain my objections. Only the top levels of developed world society can really consider that as an option. Almost all of the world has to labor just to survive. It just has always seemed so snobbish to me to think that people should all aspire to having only rewarding work to do to support themselves.

I believe in the reward of doing honest work in an honest way—that’s satisfying to me, even if I can’t always say I enjoy it. My work is not significant or important on a global scale, and I know it. But I do it pretty well.

I’ve probably told you the story of my wonderful professor, Russ Kelly, in my first year of college. One day he brought in a newspaper article about the wage increase for garbage workers in San Francisco that had recently passed. He pointed out that someday, even if we did well in college, that we may end up doing something like that because it paid well and we needed the money. But he said that a liberal education is for the enrichment of your heart and your brain, and it’s meant to give you something to think about, and a way to think about it, for the rest of your life. And he said that if someday you work as a garbage collector, you can enjoy thinking about Plato.

That’s the kind of advice that was actually helpful.

My mom (who is clearly the best) in an email this morning. <3 (via slodwick)

(via justcleverorworse)

2 148 notes

abandonedography:

The Gleno Dam was completed in 1923 and failed within 40 days of being fully filled. A small impoundment reservoir was built in the shadow of the old works, which can be seen when viewed from upstream. (via)

303 notes

Wednesday’s decision, once again a five-to-four ruling, represented another significant step away from the antiquated principle of ‘one person, one vote’ toward the more modern, and utilitarian, notion of ‘one dollar, one vote.’
John Cassidy on the McCutcheon decision: http://nyr.kr/QGFDb2 (via newyorker)

(Source : newyorker.com, via newyorker)

33 notes

markrichardson:

Some lost evening a few weeks ago I watched a large chunk of this 2007 interview with Steve Jobs and Bill Gates. A lot of interesting history here. One or both of these guys was in the room when many major decisions that would have a huge impact on culture were made. Interesting how different they are in terms of presence. Jobs really is magnetic and always seems hyper confident, and there’s an interesting undercurrent here where both the interviewers and the audience know and understand that Apple is considered much more “cool” and innovative. That’s a given, and Jobs relishes that. There are quite a few subtle moments where people poke fun at stodgy old Microsoft. But Gates actually seems pretty comfortable with that here, he seems like someone who knows who he is. Perhaps he’s so comfortable because he knows that while Jobs was working like crazy to figure out how to make the world pay $600 for a telephone, uncool non-visionary Bill Gates was heading up a foundation that saved the lives of millions of children who would have otherwise died of malaria. 

2 787 notes

raboartcollection:

"Stagnation and movement as opposing forces form a fundamental motif that recurs in many of my works." Lonnie van Brummelen
Lonnie van Brummelen, movistar (1999) 
film (16 mm), kleur
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.Rabo Art Collection

raboartcollection:

"Stagnation and movement as opposing forces form a fundamental motif that recurs in many of my works." Lonnie van Brummelen

Lonnie van Brummelen, movistar (1999) 

film (16 mm), kleur

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

234 notes

explore-blog:

Legendary graphic designer Paula Scher's brilliant visual complaint about useless information. Pair with David Byrne on how to be an educated consumer of infographics, then play devil’s advocate with this fantastic 1936 essay on the usefulness of useless knowledge.
The poster is part of the exhibition Complaints! An Inalienable Right at Miami’s Wolfsonian Museum, curated by Steven Heller, featuring contributions by Milton Glaser, Debbie Millman, Noma Bar, Emily Oberman, yours truly, more

explore-blog:

Legendary graphic designer Paula Scher's brilliant visual complaint about useless information. Pair with David Byrne on how to be an educated consumer of infographics, then play devil’s advocate with this fantastic 1936 essay on the usefulness of useless knowledge.

The poster is part of the exhibition Complaints! An Inalienable Right at Miami’s Wolfsonian Museum, curated by Steven Heller, featuring contributions by Milton Glaser, Debbie Millman, Noma Bar, Emily Oberman, yours truly, more